The Complete & Utter History Of Jazz (Without The Boring Bits)

From The People Who Brought You 100 Years Of Jazz In 99 Minutes

The Perfect Choice For Music Festivals & Theatre Shows

The Complete & Utter History Of Jazz, Concert Showreel

Professor Long's "A Brief History Of Time" (And The Jazz Rhythm Section) 

A brand new history of jazz with a fantastic selection of music and more hilarious, musically brilliant, historically fascinating moments!

 

"The musical equivalent of the Reduced Shakespeare Company, in which none of the major musical soliloquies gets left out."  

Alyn Shipton (BBC Radio 3's Jazz Library, The Times)

 

The Jazz Repertory Company presents the follow up to the highly successful 100 Years of Jazz in 99 Minutes.  Once again going back to the beginning of jazz and coming right up to date, playing all the music we couldn't fit in the first time around.

We start off in 1902 with High Society and wind our way to the present day with many fascinating features along the way to illustrate how jazz changed. We show you how the rhythm section gradually evolved its style from the 1920s through to be-bop in just one number.

We perform I’m In The Mood For Love à la sexy Julie London, the scintillating Charlie Parker and then the scatting King Pleasure and we give you a tour de force performance of St Louis Blues that takes in every style of jazz in an extraordinary arrangement featuring Bessie Smith, Louis Armstrong, Glenn Miller, Cannonball Adderley, Kenny Ball, Stevie Wonder and Herbie Hancock!

 

The multi-instrumentalist sextet swaps instruments around with indecent haste and the band members take it in turns to fill in the short gaps with fascinating tittle tattle about the music and musicians who made the music magnificent.  It’s hugely entertaining and not to be missed.

Performed by:​

  • Pete Long: saxophones, flute, trumpet

  • Enrico Tomasso: trumpet, trombone, vocals

  • Nick Dawson: piano, clarinet, vocals

  • Dave Chamberlain: bass, guitars, banjo, piano, drums

  • Richard Pite: drums, sousaphone, double bass

  • Georgina Jackson: vocals, trumpet

100 Years of Jazz in 99 Minutes, the sell out hit concert seen around the world, from London's Cadogan Hall to Barbados, with the best jazz musicians playing all your favourite tunes, from Benny Goodman to Duke Ellington and more.

Reviews

"Listening to this remarkably versatile small band of musicians tackle the contemporary jazz of Abdullah Ibrahim with the same fervour and intensity as they produced for Miles Davis's "Kind of Blue" or Sidney Bechet's 1920s romping New Orleans jazz was a tremendous experience. Every era is evoked with complete conviction, during the musical equivalent of the Reduced Shakespeare Company, in which none of the major musical soliloquies gets left out." 

Alyn Shipton (Radio 3's Jazz Library, The Times)

​​“In Pete Long, reeds player, raconteur, bandleader and all-round wit, we have a genuine home-grown treasure. If his projects – Echoes of Ellington chief among them – have attracted few column inches in the past, it is partly because Long, who knows this music inside out, appears to wear his expertise so lightly. In another life, he might easily have been a vaudeville entertainer.”

Clive Davis (The Times)​

"Amazingly, Pite’s small-but-perfectly formed quintet does exactly what it says on the flyer.  Their pell-mell virtuosity enables them to cross the decades and vault the stylistic hurdles with ease.  Genuinely needs to be seen to be believed.  Don’t miss out!"

Peter Vacher (Jazz UK)​

Richard Pite's brilliant "100 Years of Jazz in 99 Minutes" eschewed cheap send-ups but was in fact full of real information delivered with humour; this set should be on every festival programme.

Brian Balin (Jazz UK)

"Richard Pite’s One Hundred Years of Jazz  thrilled the audience with technical virtuosity, entertained them with sharp and informative links between tunes and at the end of the set won a standing ovation. Simply brilliant!"

Fred Lindup, Swanage Jazz Festival

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